Internal Communication Tips by Rick Guilfoil, Founder/CEO, LogixStreet Here are 5 things to consider for good internal communications.  Often we focus solely on the audience and don’t think about coordinating the internal team that makes it all happen.  Keep these in mind: Give Direction:  Often times, the help you will have will be volunteer help.  These people desperately want to help in this area but you can’t assume they are on the same page with you strategy wise or priority wise.  Never just hand over the keys and let them drive the bus.  Always be involved and give direction to keep them on task. Keep an Ear to the Ground:  Many times we think of communications as a one way street…us enlightening the world about “X”.  Most of you have figured out that communications is really a two way street and listening may be the most important aspect.  It is the best way to find out if your communication style/strategy is working.  You need to listen to many different people to get a good perspective.  Just listening to your fans is not enough. Optimize:  Figure out the best way(s) to communicate with your staff.  If something can be accomplished in an email, do that instead of calling a meeting.  If a face to face meeting is required make sure to facilitate the meeting and be prepared.  You might even plan to have stand up meetings as they don’t typically run as long as a sit down meeting.  Standing keeps everyone on point and can expedite a meeting in a timely fashion. Preventative Maintenance:  I tend to live my life in a “preventative maintenance” mode, as I call it.  I am generally trying to see down the road and alleviate problems before they happen.  Planning ahead is a key.  You can read another of my blog posts about planning, here. Evaluate:  Doing communications effectively is busy work.  Often times you feel like there are not enough hours in the day.  This is no excuse not to evaluate the results of communications.  Meet with your team each quarter and talk about each communications tool.  Ask how well it is working.  What could be better.  Brainstorm new strategies.  Plan for upcoming campaigns.  These evaluations can also be enhanced through looking at website analytics or eNewsletter delivery  stats (or other measurable digital channels).  Other evaluation will take place through listening as was discussed above. This is not an all inclusive list of best practices but following these is a great start.  If you have other things to add to this list please comment below.

Internal Communication Tips

by Rick Guilfoil, Founder/CEO, LogixStreet

Here are 5 things to consider for good internal communications.  Often we focus solely on the audience and don’t think about coordinating the internal team that makes it all happen.  Keep these in mind:

Give Direction:  Often times, the help you will have will be volunteer help.  These people desperately want to help in this area but you can’t assume they are on the same page with you strategy wise or priority wise.  Never just hand over the keys and let them drive the bus.  Always be involved and give direction to keep them on task.

Keep an Ear to the Ground:  Many times we think of communications as a one way street…us enlightening the world about “X”.  Most of you have figured out that communications is really a two way street and listening may be the most important aspect.  It is the best way to find out if your communication style/strategy is working.  You need to listen to many different people to get a good perspective.  Just listening to your fans is not enough.

Optimize:  Figure out the best way(s) to communicate with your staff.  If something can be accomplished in an email, do that instead of calling a meeting.  If a face to face meeting is required make sure to facilitate the meeting and be prepared.  You might even plan to have stand up meetings as they don’t typically run as long as a sit down meeting.  Standing keeps everyone on point and can expedite a meeting in a timely fashion.

Preventative Maintenance:  I tend to live my life in a “preventative maintenance” mode, as I call it.  I am generally trying to see down the road and alleviate problems before they happen.  Planning ahead is a key.  You can read another of my blog posts about planning, here.

Evaluate:  Doing communications effectively is busy work.  Often times you feel like there are not enough hours in the day.  This is no excuse not to evaluate the results of communications.  Meet with your team each quarter and talk about each communications tool.  Ask how well it is working.  What could be better.  Brainstorm new strategies.  Plan for upcoming campaigns.  These evaluations can also be enhanced through looking at website analytics or eNewsletter delivery  stats (or other measurable digital channels).  Other evaluation will take place through listening as was discussed above.

This is not an all inclusive list of best practices but following these is a great start.  If you have other things to add to this list please comment below.