You Don’t Have to Eat the Whole Elephant at Once By Rick Guilfoil, Founder/CEO of LogixStreet Many churches find themselves in a situation where they don’t currently have a website or they have an older site that needs to be revamped.  In either situation it is easy to get overwhelmed.  For sure starting a new website from scratch has a lot of work involved just in collecting and creating content. You probably have seen or have a website in mind that you would like yours to emulate in some way.  Often, those sites that catch your eye are mature sites that have had A LOT of work put into them over time.  Again, it is easy to get overwhelmed when comparing your website to one of these. Try this approach.  Settle on some basics.  Some things you must have to have a website that is useful.  Address those basics in a phase 1 plan so you can launch the site and then tackle some other features in a phase 2 or phase 3.  A website should always be changing and expanding so why does it need to be the ultimate site when it first launches?  It doesn’t. Church website best practices will help you determine the minimum requirements for a phase 1.  You can get my free eBook called Church Website Logix on my website.  All you need to do is sign up for the LogixStreet eNewsletter and you will be sent a link where you can download the ebook (pdf) for free. If you had to choose some basic requirements for a church website, what would your top 5 list be?

You Don’t Have to Eat the Whole Elephant at Once

By Rick Guilfoil, Founder/CEO of LogixStreet

Many churches find themselves in a situation where they don’t currently have a website or they have an older site that needs to be revamped.  In either situation it is easy to get overwhelmed.  For sure starting a new website from scratch has a lot of work involved just in collecting and creating content.

You probably have seen or have a website in mind that you would like yours to emulate in some way.  Often, those sites that catch your eye are mature sites that have had A LOT of work put into them over time.  Again, it is easy to get overwhelmed when comparing your website to one of these.

Try this approach.  Settle on some basics.  Some things you must have to have a website that is useful.  Address those basics in a phase 1 plan so you can launch the site and then tackle some other features in a phase 2 or phase 3.  A website should always be changing and expanding so why does it need to be the ultimate site when it first launches?  It doesn’t.

Church website best practices will help you determine the minimum requirements for a phase 1.  You can get my free eBook called Church Website Logix on my website.  All you need to do is sign up for the LogixStreet eNewsletter and you will be sent a link where you can download the ebook (pdf) for free.

If you had to choose some basic requirements for a church website, what would your top 5 list be?